Book & Cover Review of " A Bond Never Broken" by Judith Miller

A Bond Never Broken (Daughters of Amana, Book 3)

Book Review
What was it like to be German-American during WWI? If you have ever wondered then you should put this book on your reading list. I was not familiar with the Amana Colonies previously, but author Judith Miller brought this German-American, peaceful community to life in A Bond Never Broken, book number three in her Daughters of Amana series. I have not read either of the two books in this series, but this did not hinder my enjoyment of this book. It stands on its own.
The book also dares the reader to consider what they would do if any group of people were to make demands of them, and threaten harm to those they love.  Would it be easy to make the right decision? Fear is a powerful enemy.
This was another great book by Judith Miller. I have been reading her novels for many years and they never disappoint with their beautiful combination of historical detail, realistic characters, and intriguing plot lines.  Females are the main characters in this novel, so likely women would find this more appealing to read then men – but a woman of any age who is interested in historical fiction would likely love this novel.
Cover Review
The plain calico dresses and unusual bonnets worn by the 4 women pictured on the cover help to establish that this is a historical novel, but not about the ever popular amish community. The posing of the woman in the foreground is also well-done. You definitely get the feeling that she is leery of something. She doesn’t seem to quite ‘belong’ even though her outfit matches that of the other three women walking away in the distance.
The background skyline and buildings seamlessly flow with the portraits of the young women. The artist has successfully captured a frozen moment in time. Both the spine and the cover would definitely attract female historical fiction fans – especially those already reading ‘bonnet fiction’ as I have so lovingly heard it referred to within the Christian market.
* This book was received from the Christian Fiction Book Alliance (CFBA) for review. An author interview and further book information can be found below (provided by the CFBA).

This week, the  Christian Fiction Blog Alliance  is introducing  A Bond Never Broken  Bethany House (March 1, 2011)  by  Judith Miller   

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: A Word from Judith:

Most readers want to know how authors ‘got started’ writing. My first novel, Threads of Love, was conceived when I was commuting sixty miles to work each day. I wanted to tell the story of a pioneer girl coming to Kansas and the faith that sustained her as she adjusted to a new life. When the book was completed, I tucked it away. I had absolutely no idea how publication of a book occurred and had given no thought to the concept. However, through a co-worker, I was directed to Tracie Peterson who, at that time, worked down the hall from me. Having never met Tracie, I was totally unaware of her writing career, but God intervened. The rest is, as they say, history…

With a graciousness that continues to amaze me, Tracie agreed to read my story, directed me to a publisher, and gave me information on a Christian writers conference. Since that first encounter many years ago, I have been blessed with the publication of numerous books, novellas and a juvenile fiction book. Joyously, Tracie and I had the opportunity to develop a blessed friendship. In fact, we have co-authored several series together, including The Bells of Lowell, the Lights of Lowell and The Broadmoor Legacy. In addition, I have continued to write several solo series.   

ABOUT THE BOOK   

For many years, Ilsa Redlich has helped her parents run a hotel in South Amana, but as the United States enters the Great War, she can feel her world changing. The residents of the towns surrounding the Amana Colonies used to be accepting of their quiet, peaceful neighbors, but with anti-German sentiment running high, the Amana villages are now plagued by vandalism, threats, and insults.

Things get even worse when Ilsa finds out her family won’t be allowed to speak German in public–and that Garon, the childhood friend she’s long been smitten with, has decided to join the army. Jutta Schmidt is shocked when several members of the Council of National Defense show up on her family’s doorstep. Sure, the Schmidts once lived in the Amana Colonies, but that was years ago. She’s even more surprised when the council demands that she travel to Amana and report back on any un-American activities.

Not daring to disobey the government agents, Jutta takes a job at the South Amana hotel, befriends the daughter of the owners, and begins to eavesdrop every chance she gets. When Jutta hears Ilsa making antiwar remarks and observes Garon assisting a suspicious outsider, she is torn at the prospect of betraying her new friends.

But what choice does she have? And when Garon is accused of something far worse than Jutta could imagine, can the Amana community come to his aid in time?

If you would like to read the first chapter of A Bond Never Broken, go HERE.

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About Suzanne Wesley

Suzanne lives in Indiana with her husband and their two girls. In May of 2009 she began freelancing from her home office, using a combination of writing and graphic design skills to create professional-level, marketing materials for individuals and businesses at affordable rates. She has a BS degree from Indiana State University (1996); and completed majors in both English, Liberal Art and Fine Art, Graphic Design. Suzanne also completed the Apprenticeship writing program of the Christian Writer's Guild and is a member of American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW). View all posts by Suzanne Wesley

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